New SWISS.COM website makes booking even easier

11 July 2007

SWISS has made it simpler than ever to book its flights online. The company’s SWISS.COM website now sports a new look, and is even easier to use and navigate than before.

SWISS constantly strives to offer its customers services of outstanding quality at every conceivable level. Those endeavours extend well beyond the air travel itself, right back to obtaining the requisite information and booking the flight.

In line with these aspirations, SWISS has revamped its SWISS.COM website to make it even more customer-friendly and easy to navigate around. To maximise the improvements, tests were conducted with users throughout the latest development phase, and their findings were fed straight into determining the site’s final look.

All the innovations on the new SWISS.COM site are aimed squarely at customer convenience. Top priority has been given to presenting SWISS flight offers and the booking process as clearly and simply as possible. Indeed, the most attractive offers of all are now prominently displayed on the site’s home page.

Bookings at the click of a mouseThe new-look website permits visitors to book their SWISS flight by making just a few mouseclicks on an interactive world map, eliminating the time-consuming switching between keyboard and mouse.

The new procedure is designed not to ensure as few mouseclicks as possible but to follow the user’s natural intuition. It also gives greater emphasis to value-for-money considerations within the booking process.

The opportunity has also been taken to integrate webpages that are specifically tailored to the various local markets, and to improve the presentation of hotel and rental car information. So here, too, SWISS is further aligning its products and services to its customers’ individual needs.

The SWISS.COM website is maintained in Switzerland’s three national languages – German, French and Italian – and in English. SWISS.COM bookings already account for some 18% of all SWISS’s ticket sales (compared to 16.5% in 2006).